Sentence Formulas Packet
 

Sentence Types and Formulas

 

Simple

 

 

SV

 

 

SVV

 

SSV

 

 

SSVV

*more than one subject and more than one verb will be combined using the coordinating conjunction “and.”

 

Compound

 

 

I,cI

 

 

I;I

 

Complex

 

ID

 

 

D,I

* Dependent clauses always begin with a subordinating conjunction.

 

Key:

S= subject       I= independent clause           c= coordinating

V= Verb           D= dependent clause                  conjunction

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simple Sentence:  A sentence that has one independent clause.

(sv  ssv  svv  ssvv)

 

Independent Clause: a group of words which

  1. makes a complete statement
  2. has a subject and a verb (predicate)

 

Subject: The noun a sentence is about

          Noun: a person, place, thing, quality, or idea

 

Predicate: shows the state of being or the action of the subject of the 

                   sentence

 

Verbs: a verb is a word that shows action, being, or state of being

 

       Action verb –   expresses action

           

State-of-being/linking verbs – show that someone or something is. Links subject

with information about the subject. It does not show action.  

Forms of is are (is, am, are, was, were, be, being, been)

Is is always a verb!

 

Helping Verbs – verbs that help the main verb of the sentence by extending the

                                      meaning

 

may
might
must




be
being
been
am
are
is
was
were

(main)

do
does
did






(main)

should
could
would

have
had
has






(main)

will
can
shall

**helping verbs in the columns labeled “main” can also be the main verb in a sentence.

 

Compound Sentences: A compound sentence has two or more

          independent clauses. (I,cI     I;I )

 

Coordinating Conjunctions: a word that is used with a comma to join two

independent clauses. Coordinating conjunctions create a relationship between the two clauses. (hint: boys fan)

 

,but           ,or              ,yet            ,so              ,for            ,and           ,nor

 

Semicolons: Semicolons (;) can also be used to join two independent clauses.**The clauses need to closely relate**

Complex Sentences:  A complex sentence has one independent clause and one or more dependent clauses. (ID      D,I)

 

Dependent Clause:  A dependent clause is a group of words with a subject

          and a verb that cannot stand alone. It needs to lean on an independent

          clause.

 

**Dependent clauses always begin with a subordinating

          conjunction. Placing a subordinating conjunction at the beginning of

          an independent clause makes the clause dependent.**

 

Subordinating Conjunctions:  Subordinating conjunctions are words that

          show the relationship of the dependent clause to the independent

          clause.

 

Some subordinating conjunctions are:

 

after

even if

since

although

even though

so that

as

if

than

as if

in order that

though

as long as

just as

unless

as soon as

like

until

as though

once

when

because

provided

whenever

before

rather than

while

wherever

 

 

 

 

Compound-Complex: A compound-complex sentence has two or more independent clauses and at least one dependent clause.

 

 

D,I;I

D,I,cI

ID,cI

ID;I

I,cID

I;ID

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Example Sentences

 

Simple Sentences

-Underline the verbs and circle the subjects(nouns).

Formula

Example

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Compound Sentences

-Circle the semicolon or the comma and the coordinating conjunction

Formula

Example

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Complex Sentences

-Circle the subordinating conjunction in each example.

Formula

Example

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES/EXAMPLES:

 

*NOT is NOT a verb. It is an adverb. It can often split the verb.

 

Example:   Kate could not find her left shoe.

                        Kate couldn’t find her left shoe. (watch out for contractions)

 

*The main verb of a sentence will not come after the word “to” unless an “and comes between the “to” and the verb.

 

                                  *                *

Example:  Chad went to the pool to apply for a lifeguard job.

 

 

*If there is more than one subject, they will have the coordinating conjunction “and” between them.

 

*If there is more than one verb, they will have the coordinating conjunction “and” between them.

 

                       

 

er